Disability Prevention vs Disability Management

Disability Management

Disability Prevention 

Compares the physical demands of a job as it is currently performed to a worker’s restrictions. If there is not a direct match, the worker is determined to be unable to perform the job or essential tasks that cannot be performed are downloaded onto another worker.

Compares the physical demands of the preinjury job to a worker’s restrictions. Where there is a barrier or mismatch, creative solutions are considered and the best one is implemented in order to remove the barrier(s) and allow full performance of the essential duties.

Determine Where PDD(s) Required

An important first step in your PDD program is determining which jobs require a PDD. If you are currently without any PDDs, you will require documentation for all jobs. In some cases you may have PDDs, but they are outdated, or you have new jobs that have yet to be documented. A review of all current jobs and PDDs on file should be conducted to identify gaps and create a list of jobs without up to date PDDs.

Considerations 

  • All Current Jobs
  • Existing PDDs
  • Dates of Existing PDDs
  • New Processes Since Last PDDs
  • New Equipment or Tools Since Last PDDs
  • New Jobs Since Last PDDs

Determine Who Needs to be Involved

Having all of the appropriate people involved is crucial to creating a collection of PDDs that are accurate and therefore useful. All individuals may not be involved in every step of the PDD process, but may be required for certain aspects such as verifying the essential tasks of

the job, data collection, or even providing job descriptions.

Common People Involved

  • Workers Performing the Job
  • Supervisors
  • Managers
  • HR
  • Union
  • JHSC
  • Maintenance

Have All Necessary Equipment

In order to create accurate PDDs, certain equipment will be required in order to measure aspects of the work that is being observed. Whether it is measurement of working heights, or the weight of a load being lifted, there are common tools that should be available in order to collect accurate data for PDDs.

Have Trained Observer(s)

If the worker or consultant performing the observation and data collection isn’t a Canadian Certified Professional Ergonomist (CCPE), than he or she should have appropriate training in conducting PDDs. The training should include multiple elements such as task analysis, observation, measurement, data collection, photographing and video recording for PDDs, and documentation. With appropriate and thorough training, anyone within your organization could complete PDDs effectively.

Have All Necessary Equipment

In order to create accurate PDDs, certain equipment will be required in order to measure aspects of the work that is being observed. Whether it is measurement of working heights, or the weight of a load being lifted, there are common tools that should be available in order to collect accurate data for PDDs.

Schedule Observation and Data Collection 

Scheduling when the observation and data collection will take place is an important consideration to ensure accurate data. All people that were identified as necessary for data collection must be available. It is critical that all parameters that could affect the results are considered in order to capture the physical demands that truly represent the job; production levels, staffing levels, shift type, etc. could all have an impact on the data collected on a particular day. It may be necessary to schedule data collection on multiple days in order to document a range of activities under different conditions.

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Are necessary people available?
  • When is the highest workload?
  • When is the lowest workload?
  • Is there a difference in workload between days/shifts?
  • Are there variations in staffing levels?
  • Will all tasks be performed during observation and data collection?

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